Contract - Interiors Awards 2011: Environmental Winner

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Interiors Awards 2011: Environmental Winner

07 March, 2011

-By Danine Alati


project: Lance Armstrong Foundation Livestrong Headquarters
client: Lance Armstrong Foundation
location: East Austin, Texas
designer: The Bommarito Group


When The Bommarito Group was first commissioned to design the new Lance Armstrong Foundation Livestrong headquarters in East Austin, the directives were clear: create a healthy building, where employees want to be and that easily supports their functions. Marla Bommarito, CEO of her Austin-based design firm, recalls, “Lance Armstrong told the project team that this project was not about cycling; it was about curing cancer and promoting healthy lifestyles.” Bommarito worked with project manager Greg Lee, CPA, chief financial officer of Lance Armstrong Foundation (LAF), to ensure that the design team did not stray from the initial goals.

“We wanted to build and remodel in the most environmentally friendly way possible—it is the right thing to do for our staff and our community,” Lee explains. “As we progressed through the concept design stages, we were aware that we could be achieving different LEED levels, but it was not the primary driver.” All members of The Bommarito Group team believe in sustainable design (100 percent of the firm’s design staff is LEED accredited), and, ultimately, the Livestrong headquarters earned LEED Gold Certification.

In addition to constructing a healthy headquarters, LAF wanted the building set in an underserved community. “LAF has the goal to be close to the market that cannot afford physicians to diagnose early,” says Bommarito. “More than 180,000 people that die each year did not even know they had cancer. LAF pledges to fix this, and this facility and this design team are key to supporting this goal.”

The warehouse building presented challenges in that it offered little character with plain concrete floors, no windows, and little natural light. But LAF recognized other beneficial characteristics, such as 24-ft. ceilings, spacious interiors, and natural wood roof and glulam ceiling beams that were removed during the renovation and repurposed as interior architectural elements. Employing low-VOC construction materials and finishes, renewable energy sources, and native vegetation, and encouraging workers to bike to work by providing bike storage and employee showering facilities promoted LAF’s green mission.

The designers opened the façade by adding storefront windows and a sawtooth roof to flood the interiors with daylight. The remilled roof decking was used to construct “boxes” that create neighborhoods within the office layout. “An interior cityscape was developed with a main street (main circulation corridor), buildings (conference, kitchen, or copy centers), and parks adjacent to the main street that are a combination of seating, open meeting, and shared working areas,” explains Bommarito. Lee appreciates how circulation is intuitively designed as meandering paths within the office, and he cites the transformation of a former loading dock into a team meeting space as one of his favorite design elements, along with the boardroom crafted from ceiling beams and furniture handmade from naturally fallen trees. With copious use of tactile wood, the palette is natural and rugged, with yellow accents that reflect Armstrong’s seven Tour de France winning jerseys.

Bommarito stresses that the greatest design challenge was exceeding expectations. “The project had to be better than good; it had to be exceptional,” she says. “The high-stress office had to be sensitive to the pressure that the employees live with every day and convey a strong partnership with the community and a sustainable design that is real and not pretentious. The LAF project was to meet all of these challenges in respect to Lance Armstrong, who has had so many accomplishments—the most important to him being promoting the awareness of cancer worldwide, not the Tour de France wins.”

who
Project: Lance Armstrong Foundation – Livestrong Headquarters. Client: Lance Armstrong Foundation. Architect: Lake|Flato; Ted Flato, FAIA; Bob Harris, FAIA, LEED AP; Ryan Jones, AIA. Interior designer: The Bommarito Group; Marla Bommarito-Crouch, FIIDA, ASID, LEED AP, principal in charge/CEO; Marc Bove, AIA, IIDA, LEED AP, project architect & president; Judy Bush, IIDA, LEED AP, project interior designer & VP/director of design; Christine Briseno, IIDA, LEED AP; interior design & vice president; Mary Piette, IIDA, LEED AP; project manager; Craig Wingfield, project architect; Dawn James, RID, LEED AP; Blair Langlinais, LEED AP; Chris Erickson, LEED AP; Jacquelyn Fossier, Rebecca Elliott, interior designers; James Hadden, LEED AP, construction administration. Contractor: Spaw/Maxwell. Lighting: Brown Design Consulting. MEP: ACR Engineering, Inc. Structural engineer: Architectural Engineers Collaborative. Civil/surveying/environmental engineer: Baker-Aicklen & Associates. Environmental/geotechnical engineer: Terracon Consulting Engineers & Scientists. Landscape Architect: Ten Eych Landscape Architecture. Graphics: fd2s Wayfinding Consulting & Environmental Graphic Design. Furniture dealer: Shelton Keller Group, Workplace Resources, Rockford Business Interiors. LEED consultant: Center for Maximum Building Potential. Roofing/Exterior Envelope; Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. Building commissioning: ACR Engineering. Accessibility: Accessibility Unlimited. Audio/Visual: Onsite AV Service Partners. Data/IT: AVNET Enterprise Solutions. Specification writer: IntroSpec.Photographer: Casey Dunn.

what

Wallcoverings: Knoll. Paint: Benjamin Moore, ICI, Sherwin-Williams. Wall panels: Homasote Company. Carpet tile: InterfaceFLOR. Carpet fiber: Aquafil. Ceiling: Tectum. Lighting: Energie, Lighting Services, Inc., Lutron, Osram. Window treatments: Mecho Shade. Workstations, Conference seating: Knoll. Workstation seating: Herman Miller, Knoll. Lounge seating: Coalesse, Harter, Keilhauer. Cafeteria, dining, auditorium seating: Knoll Studio, Allermuir. Conference Gallery Seating: Bernhardt. Benches: Solid Core. Upholstery: Designtex, Knoll, Maharam. Conference tables: Solid Core. Cafeteria, dining, training tables: Fixtures Furniture. Other tables: Harter, Herman Miller, Coalesse. Credenzas: Solid Core, Herman Miller. Architectural woodworking: Janov. Signage: Sign Crafters.

where
Location: Austin, TX. Total floor area: 30,000 sq. ft. No. of floors: 1. Total staff size: 95 + volunteers. Cost: $4.9 million.



Interiors Awards 2011: Environmental Winner

07 March, 2011


Casey Dunn

project: Lance Armstrong Foundation Livestrong Headquarters
client: Lance Armstrong Foundation
location: East Austin, Texas
designer: The Bommarito Group


When The Bommarito Group was first commissioned to design the new Lance Armstrong Foundation Livestrong headquarters in East Austin, the directives were clear: create a healthy building, where employees want to be and that easily supports their functions. Marla Bommarito, CEO of her Austin-based design firm, recalls, “Lance Armstrong told the project team that this project was not about cycling; it was about curing cancer and promoting healthy lifestyles.” Bommarito worked with project manager Greg Lee, CPA, chief financial officer of Lance Armstrong Foundation (LAF), to ensure that the design team did not stray from the initial goals.

“We wanted to build and remodel in the most environmentally friendly way possible—it is the right thing to do for our staff and our community,” Lee explains. “As we progressed through the concept design stages, we were aware that we could be achieving different LEED levels, but it was not the primary driver.” All members of The Bommarito Group team believe in sustainable design (100 percent of the firm’s design staff is LEED accredited), and, ultimately, the Livestrong headquarters earned LEED Gold Certification.

In addition to constructing a healthy headquarters, LAF wanted the building set in an underserved community. “LAF has the goal to be close to the market that cannot afford physicians to diagnose early,” says Bommarito. “More than 180,000 people that die each year did not even know they had cancer. LAF pledges to fix this, and this facility and this design team are key to supporting this goal.”

The warehouse building presented challenges in that it offered little character with plain concrete floors, no windows, and little natural light. But LAF recognized other beneficial characteristics, such as 24-ft. ceilings, spacious interiors, and natural wood roof and glulam ceiling beams that were removed during the renovation and repurposed as interior architectural elements. Employing low-VOC construction materials and finishes, renewable energy sources, and native vegetation, and encouraging workers to bike to work by providing bike storage and employee showering facilities promoted LAF’s green mission.

The designers opened the façade by adding storefront windows and a sawtooth roof to flood the interiors with daylight. The remilled roof decking was used to construct “boxes” that create neighborhoods within the office layout. “An interior cityscape was developed with a main street (main circulation corridor), buildings (conference, kitchen, or copy centers), and parks adjacent to the main street that are a combination of seating, open meeting, and shared working areas,” explains Bommarito. Lee appreciates how circulation is intuitively designed as meandering paths within the office, and he cites the transformation of a former loading dock into a team meeting space as one of his favorite design elements, along with the boardroom crafted from ceiling beams and furniture handmade from naturally fallen trees. With copious use of tactile wood, the palette is natural and rugged, with yellow accents that reflect Armstrong’s seven Tour de France winning jerseys.

Bommarito stresses that the greatest design challenge was exceeding expectations. “The project had to be better than good; it had to be exceptional,” she says. “The high-stress office had to be sensitive to the pressure that the employees live with every day and convey a strong partnership with the community and a sustainable design that is real and not pretentious. The LAF project was to meet all of these challenges in respect to Lance Armstrong, who has had so many accomplishments—the most important to him being promoting the awareness of cancer worldwide, not the Tour de France wins.”

who
Project: Lance Armstrong Foundation – Livestrong Headquarters. Client: Lance Armstrong Foundation. Architect: Lake|Flato; Ted Flato, FAIA; Bob Harris, FAIA, LEED AP; Ryan Jones, AIA. Interior designer: The Bommarito Group; Marla Bommarito-Crouch, FIIDA, ASID, LEED AP, principal in charge/CEO; Marc Bove, AIA, IIDA, LEED AP, project architect & president; Judy Bush, IIDA, LEED AP, project interior designer & VP/director of design; Christine Briseno, IIDA, LEED AP; interior design & vice president; Mary Piette, IIDA, LEED AP; project manager; Craig Wingfield, project architect; Dawn James, RID, LEED AP; Blair Langlinais, LEED AP; Chris Erickson, LEED AP; Jacquelyn Fossier, Rebecca Elliott, interior designers; James Hadden, LEED AP, construction administration. Contractor: Spaw/Maxwell. Lighting: Brown Design Consulting. MEP: ACR Engineering, Inc. Structural engineer: Architectural Engineers Collaborative. Civil/surveying/environmental engineer: Baker-Aicklen & Associates. Environmental/geotechnical engineer: Terracon Consulting Engineers & Scientists. Landscape Architect: Ten Eych Landscape Architecture. Graphics: fd2s Wayfinding Consulting & Environmental Graphic Design. Furniture dealer: Shelton Keller Group, Workplace Resources, Rockford Business Interiors. LEED consultant: Center for Maximum Building Potential. Roofing/Exterior Envelope; Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. Building commissioning: ACR Engineering. Accessibility: Accessibility Unlimited. Audio/Visual: Onsite AV Service Partners. Data/IT: AVNET Enterprise Solutions. Specification writer: IntroSpec.Photographer: Casey Dunn.

what

Wallcoverings: Knoll. Paint: Benjamin Moore, ICI, Sherwin-Williams. Wall panels: Homasote Company. Carpet tile: InterfaceFLOR. Carpet fiber: Aquafil. Ceiling: Tectum. Lighting: Energie, Lighting Services, Inc., Lutron, Osram. Window treatments: Mecho Shade. Workstations, Conference seating: Knoll. Workstation seating: Herman Miller, Knoll. Lounge seating: Coalesse, Harter, Keilhauer. Cafeteria, dining, auditorium seating: Knoll Studio, Allermuir. Conference Gallery Seating: Bernhardt. Benches: Solid Core. Upholstery: Designtex, Knoll, Maharam. Conference tables: Solid Core. Cafeteria, dining, training tables: Fixtures Furniture. Other tables: Harter, Herman Miller, Coalesse. Credenzas: Solid Core, Herman Miller. Architectural woodworking: Janov. Signage: Sign Crafters.

where
Location: Austin, TX. Total floor area: 30,000 sq. ft. No. of floors: 1. Total staff size: 95 + volunteers. Cost: $4.9 million.
 


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